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| August 3, 2016

For this assignment you will complete the next three steps in the design of your comprehensive nutrition education program: Selecting Theory, Stating Objectives, and Designing Activities. You will complete Step 3, 4, and 5A-5C using the worksheets provided. Be certain that you have completed all of the information fields on the worksheets including the reference section.

I have done the first one which is 1 and 2. I’ll give u the first one that have already been done so u can see what have to be done to the next 3, 4, and 5A-5C using the worksheet below.
Here is the first one i did..so u can feed of that…

Nutrition education program on management of overweight among the city dwellers in Dallas Texas

Step 1A: Issues and intended audience

Describe the demographics of your audience (e.g., age, subgroup, ethnicity) and the location of the site.

The audience of this program would compromise of city dwellers from Dallas city in Texas. For conveniences, the program would target mainly the schools and key organizations situated in the city. This is because it is possible to reach more people when the program is administered through institutions. Despite the fact that the program is designed for every city dweller, the students and the working class would be the major target because they constitute the most.

Step 1 Worksheets Analyze issues and needs to state program behavioral goals
Analyze the priority health issues for your audience.
Research. What does scientific research

suggest as the major health issues for this audience?

Policy. What do governmental guidelines recommend as priority health issues?

Scientifically, the target group for this program has been found to be vulnerable to many non-communicable diseases associated with overweight such as diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. This is because they tend to eat junked and processed food and exercise less, which makes them increase in weight beyond the expected target. The scientific research shows that if students and middle class individuals are not educated on how to live a healthy lifestyle, then the chances of them becoming obese at later stages are high. Consequently, students and the middle class are the key targets that need nutrition education that would help them adopt a healthy lifestyle.

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Government has been striving to encourage the city dwellers to remain physically active and to avoid consumption of processed and high-caloric food. The government has banned consumption of some drinks which are known to increase the weight faster.
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Audience. What are specific health issues and needs related to the intended audience (from objective and subjective data)?

Organization. What does the organization and/or funding source state as key health priorities to address?

There are two specific health issues and needs related to the intended audience. The first issue is that the intended audiences are physically inactive yet it is expected to be the most physically active groups. The second issue is that the intended audience are considered to be the major consumers of fast foods, which are high caloric and predispose one to overweight

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Some of the key health priorities to address the issues include nutrition education and sensitization of the targeted audience on how to adopt a healthy lifestyle. Another priority is to facilitate physical activity by encouraging the use of bicycle and building the walking lanes alongside the roads to encourage city dwellers to engage themselves in physical activity through walking.

Step 1 Worksheets Analyze issues and needs to state program behavioral goals
Determine one or two priority health issues for the program to address. From the issues you identified, prioritize based on greatest need, whether education can help, the importance to the audience, and importance to the organization.

The major priority health issues that would be address is the high level of physical inactivity among the city dwellers. The other health issue that would be addressed in the unhealthy dietary lifestyle adopted by most of the city dwellers. Education is considered the major intervention measures that can help change such behaviors for good. Achieving the set goals would ensure that the audiences are not predisposed to overweight and related non-communicable diseases. The organization would also ensure that the population is healthy and hence would save the cost of managing non-communicable diseases.

Step 1B: Contributing behaviors or practices

Identify the behaviors or practices that contribute to the priority health issues.
Nutrition

research literature

Monitoring data

or consumer surveys

Information from

intended audience

Sources indicate that poor dietary practices adopted by most of the students and working class population are major contributory factors to overweight and obesity. Existing literature also indicates that lack of enough physical activities leads to the accumulation of fats, which therefore encourage overweight and obesity (Pinto 1995).

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Monitoring data concurs with the hypotheses in the documented literature sources. This is because the data reveals that the working-class have no time to balance their diet and hence opt to fast and processed foods. Monitoring data also indicate that the students and working class are used to using vehicles instead of walking even when they are going for short distances. This encourages physical inactivity.

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Significant percentage of the intended audience admits that they consume fast food as the major food because of its tasty and accessibility. They also admit that the often walk less and instead use vehicles and at the same time, most of them indicated that they watch videos most often.

Step 1 Worksheets Analyze issues and needs to state program behavioral goals
List the top behaviors or practices that contribute to the priority health issues. Then rate each issue on importance, modifiability, feasibility, and desirability.

Behavior/practice

Importance for health issue

Modifiable*

Feasible

Desirable to audience

1. Eating of fast food

9

8

8

8

2. Watching Television

7

9

8

9

3. Using vehicle

8

8

8

8

4. Drinking alcohol

7

9

9

8

5. Consuming soft drinks

8

9

9

8

*Consider complexity, relative advantage, compatibility, and observability of behavior.

Step 1C: Behavioral goals

Choose one or a few behavioral goals from the list above to be the focus of your program. State the selected behavioral goals and provide justification for the selection of your focus behaviors or community practices.

One of the behaviors that would be a target for the program is to increase the level of physical activity among the city dwellers. The nutrition education would sensitize the audience about the need for high level of physical activity. It will inform them why low level of physical activity is harmful to their health (Keating, Guan, Castro Pinero , Bridges 2005). Some of the selected behavioral goals that would be expected include high utilization of pedestrian paths or lanes, use of bicycles instead of cars, reduction in the time taken watching Television, utilization of recreation facilities such as fields in activities such as running, playing football and any kind of exercise (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 1997).
Another behavior that would be a target for program is healthy dietary practices. Some of the selected behavioral goals that would be expected include decrease in consumption of fast food, refined foods, soft and alcoholic drinks and increase in consumption of vegetables, fruits, whole meals such as brown bread and whole cereals.

Step 1 Worksheets Analyze issues and needs to state program behavioral goals

References

Keating XD, Guan J, Castro Pinero J, Bridges, DM. A meta-analysis of college students’ physical activity behaviors. J Am Coll Health 2005; 54(2):116-125.
Pinto B.M. (1995). A stages of change approach to understanding college students’ physical activity. J Am Coll Health 1995; 44(1):27-31.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (1997). Update: Prevalence of overweight among children, adolescents, and adults-United States, 1988-1994. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 1997; 46:199-202.

Step 2 Worksheets Identify personal and environmental mediators of change
In Step 2, you will find out as much as possible about why audience members make the food and activity choices they do as well as what might motivate, facilitate, and support them to take on the goal behaviors. Theory provides you with the framework to ask the questions and organize the answers.
At the end of the Step 2 worksheets, you should have the following products for Steps 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D, and 2E:
Step 2A: Description of the sociocultural environment in which your audience lives.
Step 2B: List of current behaviors, practices, policies, and environmental factors that are assets for the audience’s achievement of the program goal behaviors.
Step 2C: List of thoughts, feelings, and skills that are rooted in theory that potentially mediate the audience’s motivation for and ability to achieve the program’s goal behaviors or community practices.
Step 2D: List of potential actions for the program to take to provide environment and policy supports for the audience’s achievement of the program goal behaviors.
Step 2E: Description of audience characteristics and list of resource considerations that will help you plan the practical aspects of your program.
Use these worksheets as guides to help you identify the personal mediators and environmental determinants of change. Cite information sources in the text and add references to the bibliography at the end of the step. Electronic versions of these worksheets are available at http://nutrition.jbpub.com/education/2e/. If you are unable to access the worksheets electronically, you can write onto this blank worksheet or create a text document that uses the same flow of information.

Step 2A: Audience’s sociocultural environment

Describe the social and cultural environment of the audience with respect to your goal behaviors. Consider the following questions: What is their life stage (e.g., teen, senior, mother), and how does this stage influence their eating and activity patterns? What is their living situation, and how does this influence their eating and activity patterns? What are the cultural beliefs that influence their eating and activity patterns? How does their lifestyle (e.g., work, family, recreation, social obligations) influence their ability to make healthy food and activity choices? How do their religious beliefs influence their eating and activity patterns?

As stated, the audience for the program would comprise of young adults, which constitute high school and college students and those working in the companies within the Dallas City. This is a group of population that is vulnerable to the overweight because they are in stage where they have freedom to do many things. Their stage influences their eating and activity patterns in many ways. Firstly, they are in a stage where parties are valued so much and hence they are bound to eat and drink unhealthy food. Most of them also live independently and hence they have no parental guidance and ends up eating carelessly (Torres, and Nowson 2007). Culture also has major influence on their behaviors. Most of them believe that getting fatter is a sign of health and wealth and hence are tempted to increase weights. Their lifestyle, as stated, tends to predispose them to unhealthy eating because they like parties so much.

Step 2 Worksheets Identify personal and environmental mediators of change

Step 2B: Individual and community assets

Identify existing behaviors, practices, environmental factors, and policies that support your goal behaviors.

Individual behaviors and community practices that support your program’s behavioral goals

Environmental factors and policies that support your program’s behavioral goals

Currently, the existing individual behaviors in the Dallas city include the physical activity behaviors such as walking to schools and work, increase in consumption of vegetables as evidenced by the market analysis of the trend in vegetable consumption. Community practices supporting the behavioral goals include formation of sport tournament on weekends and also garden farming (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 1997).

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Some of the environmental factors include the construction of walk streets and improving security along the streets that enable people to walk even in the night

Step 2C: Potential personal mediators

Find out about your audience’s thoughts and feelings related to the motivational mediators listed below from psychosocial theories.

Potential motivating mediators from theory

Audience’s thoughts and feelings in relation to each mediator, specific to achieving your goal behaviors

Perceived risk or sense of concern

The audience overlook the perceive risk and instead value the pleasurable lifestyle characterized by eating of sugary food, parties and watching of movies.

Perceived benefits
(i.e., positive outcome expectations)

Few of the audience believe that adopting healthy dietary and physical activity lifestyle is associated with positive outcomes

Perceived barriers
(i.e., negative outcome expectations)

The main barriers is the peer influence, which force youths to indulge themselves in parties where refined foods, soft drinks and alcohol are major menu

Affective attitudes
(i.e., feelings about the behavior)

As stated, most of the youth have a notion that there is still time to change and hence does not have strong feeling that they should change the behavior now. They consider the current behavior as relevant to their ages

Perceived behavioral control/self-efficacy

Social norms
(i.e., what others think participants should do)

Others especially the older population think that the participants should adopt healthy lifestyles

Descriptive norms
(i.e., beliefs of others about the behavior)

There are varied beliefs. Older population, which is mostly affected, believe that the younger population should start adopting the healthy behaviors at early age

Other

Step 2 Worksheets Identify personal and environmental mediators of change
Find out about your audience’s knowledge, skills, and other factors from theory listed below.

Facilitating mediators from theory

Audience’s knowledge and skills in relation to each mediator, specific to achieving your goal behaviors

Food and nutrition knowledge

Audience have average food and nutrition knowledge

Food and nutrition skills related to the targeted behavior

Audience have difficulty in coming up with meal plan that comprise of more vegetables, fibers and less refined food

Critical thinking skills

Audience are average in critical thinking skills

Self-efficacy

The audience are average in self-efficacy

Goal setting (making action plans)

Audience are poor in making action plan

Self-assessment/self-monitoring skills

Audience are average in self-monitoring skills

Reinforcements

There are limited reinforcement available

Others

Step 2D: Environmental/policy supports

Find out how you could change the environmental and policy supports listed below to facilitate your intended audience in performing your goal behaviors.

Environmental and policy supports

How each environmental and policy support could be changed, specific to achieving your goal behaviors

Decision makers’ awareness and motivation

Educate them on the best choices concerning dietary practices and physical

Social environment

(e.g., family, networks, support)

Encourage students to pass the message to their families by rewarding them depending on how well the change their dietary habits

Food environment

(e.g., availability, accessibility)

Propose to the government to ban soft drinks and some highly caloric food in the city. Organize the program to promote the supply of fruits and vegetables in the city

Built environment

(e.g., walkable streets, parks)

Support the development and utilization of walkable streets and parks and discourage the use of vehicles

Organizational food policy

Amend the food policy to ban the production and consumption of certain food such as soft drinks

Information environment

(e.g., media watched/read, setting)

Discourage the watching of television and facilitate the increase in health programs

Policy activities at the community and national levels

Step 2 Worksheets Identify personal and environmental mediators of change

Step 2E: Audience and resources

Add details about your audience that are important for delivering your program.
Audience trait

Description

Educational level or schooling

High level of education

Physical and cognitive developmental level and ability (children only)

N/A

Literacy and numeracy skills

Good

Preferred learning style

Learner-based

Special needs

Few have special needs such as learning disabilities but this would be gathered for accordingly

Emotional needs

Relatively stable emotionally

Social needs

High

Describe the resources available for your program.
Program resources

Available resources

Time

The program would be conducted for 3 months

Space

Involved institutions would offer space for carrying out the program

Equipment

Major equipment available PowerPoint projectors and laptops

General administrative support

The administrators would be expected to offer space and allow the program to be conducted in their institutions. The administrators would also help in

Step 2 Worksheets Identify personal and environmental mediators of change

References

Torres S. J., Nowson C. A. (2007). Relationship between stress, eating behavior, and obesity. Nutrition 2007; 23:887-894.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (1997). Update: Prevalence of overweight among children, adolescents, and adults-United States, 1988-1994. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 1997; 46:199-202.

Step 1 Worksheets Analyze issues and needs to state program behavioral goals
Before you design any nutrition education intervention, whether it is a few sessions or a larger program with several components, it is important to determine your intervention focus and identify your intended primary audience. When those have been determined, you will need detailed information on the behaviors and practices that contribute to the issue or problem you have selected as your intervention focus. Step 1 worksheets will help you conduct assessments to obtain the information you will need.
Think of yourself as a detective as you work through these worksheets. You are trying to find out as much as you can to determine which core behaviors or behavioral goals will be the targets for your educational sessions.
The information you collect may be quite extensive, depending on the scope and duration of your intervention, and will vary by category. Cite information sources (e.g., journal article, government report, observation, interview) used in the worksheet in a bibliography at the end of this step.
At the end of the Step 1 worksheets, you should have products for Steps 1A, 1B, and 1C as follows:
Step 1A: Health issues or needs (one or two) and primary intended audience for the nutrition education intervention. Examples are “overweight in teenagers” or “low rates of breastfeeding in a low-income audience.”
Step 1B: High-priority behaviors contributing to the selected issues. A set of one to a few nutrition-related behaviors or community practices that contribute to the health issue(s) that you identified.
Step 1C: Statement of the program’s behavioral or action goals. The behavioral or action goals describe the purpose or behavioral outcomes for the program in terms of behaviors or community practices.
Use these worksheets as guides to help you identify program behavioral goals. Cite information sources in the text and add references to the bibliography at the end of the step. Electronic versions of these worksheets are available

at http://nutrition.jbpub.com/education/2e. If you are unable to access the worksheets electronically, you can write onto this blank worksheet or create a text document that uses the same flow of information.

Step 1A: Issues and intended audience

Describe the demographics of your audience (e.g., age, subgroup, ethnicity) and the location of the site.

Step 1 Worksheets Analyze issues and needs to state program behavioral goals
Analyze the priority health issues for your audience.

Research. What does scientific research

suggest as the major health issues for this audience?

Policy. What do governmental guidelines recommend as priority health issues?
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Audience. What are specific health issues and needs related to the intended audience (from objective and subjective data)?

Organization. What does the organization and/or funding source state as key health priorities to address?

Step 1 Worksheets Analyze issues and needs to state program behavioral goals
Determine one or two priority health issues for the program to address. From the issues you identified, prioritize based on greatest need, whether education can help, the importance to the audience, and importance to the organization.

Step 1B: Contributing behaviors or practices

Identify the behaviors or practices that contribute to the priority health issues.

Nutrition

research literature

Monitoring data

or consumer surveys

Information from

intended audience

Step 1 Worksheets Analyze issues and needs to state program behavioral goals
List the top behaviors or practices that contribute to the priority health issues. Then rate each issue on importance, modifiability, feasibility, and desirability.

Behavior/practice

Importance for health issue

Modifiable*

Feasible

Desirable to audience

1
2.

3.

4.

5.

*Consider complexity, relative advantage, compatibility, and observability of behavior.

Step 1C: Behavioral goals

Choose one or a few behavioral goals from the list above to be the focus of your program. State the selected behavioral goals and provide justification for the selection of your focus behaviors or community practices.

Step 1 Worksheets Analyze issues and needs to state program behavioral goals

References

Step 2 Worksheets Identify personal and environmental mediators of change
In Step 2, you will find out as much as possible about why audience members make the food and activity choices they do as well as what might motivate, facilitate, and support them to take on the goal behaviors. Theory provides you with the framework to ask the questions and organize the answers.
At the end of the Step 2 worksheets, you should have the following products for Steps 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D, and 2E:
Step 2A: Description of the sociocultural environment in which your audience lives.
Step 2B: List of current behaviors, practices, policies, and environmental factors that are assets for the audience’s achievement of the program goal behaviors.
Step 2C: List of thoughts, feelings, and skills that are rooted in theory that potentially mediate the audience’s motivation for and ability to achieve the program’s goal behaviors or community practices.
Step 2D: List of potential actions for the program to take to provide environment and policy supports for the audience’s achievement of the program goal behaviors.
Step 2E: Description of audience characteristics and list of resource considerations that will help you plan the practical aspects of your program.
Use these worksheets as guides to help you identify the personal mediators and environmental determinants of change. Cite information sources in the text and add references to the bibliography at the end of the step. Electronic versions of these worksheets are available at http://nutrition.jbpub.com/education/2e/. If you are unable to access the worksheets electronically, you can write onto this blank worksheet or create a text document that uses the same flow of information.

Step 2A: Audience’s sociocultural environment

Describe the social and cultural environment of the audience with respect to your goal behaviors. Consider the following questions: What is their life stage (e.g., teen, senior, mother), and how does this stage influence their eating and activity patterns? What is their living situation, and how does this influence their eating and activity patterns? What are the cultural beliefs that influence their eating and activity patterns? How does their lifestyle (e.g., work, family, recreation, social obligations) influence their ability to make healthy food and activity choices? How do their religious beliefs influence their eating and activity patterns?

Step 2 Worksheets Identify personal and environmental mediators of change

Step 2B: Individual and community assets

Identify existing behaviors, practices, environmental factors, and policies that support your goal behaviors.

Individual behaviors and community practices that support your program’s behavioral goals

Environmental factors and policies that support your program’s behavioral goals

Step 2C: Potential personal mediators

Find out about your audience’s thoughts and feelings related to the motivational mediators listed below from psychosocial theories.

Potential motivating mediators from theory

Audience’s thoughts and feelings in relation to each mediator, specific to achieving your goal behaviors

Perceived risk or sense of concern

Perceived benefits
(i.e., positive outcome expectations)

Perceived barriers
(i.e., negative outcome expectations)

Affective attitudes
(i.e., feelings about the behavior)

Perceived behavioral control/self-efficacy

Social norms
(i.e., what others think participants should do)

Descriptive norms
(i.e., beliefs of others about the behavior)

Other

Step 2 Worksheets Identify personal and environmental mediators of change
Find out about your audience’s knowledge, skills, and other factors from theory listed below.

Facilitating mediators from theory

Audience’s knowledge and skills in relation to each mediator, specific to achieving your goal behaviors

Food and nutrition knowledge

Food and nutrition skills related to the targeted behavior

Critical thinking skills

Self-efficacy

Goal setting (making action plans)

Self-assessment/self-monitoring skills

Reinforcements

Others

Step 2D: Environmental/policy supports

Find out how you could change the environmental and policy supports listed below to facilitate your intended audience in performing your goal behaviors.

Environmental and policy supports

How each environmental and policy support could be changed, specific to achieving your goal behaviors

Decision makers’ awareness and motivation

Social environment

(e.g., family, networks, support)

Food environment

(e.g., availability, accessibility)

Built environment

(e.g., walkable streets, parks)

Organizational food policy

Information environment

(e.g., media watched/read, setting)

Policy activities at the community and national levels

Step 2 Worksheets Identify personal and environmental mediators of change

Step 2E: Audience and resources

Add details about your audience that are important for delivering your program.

Audience trait

Description

Educational level or schooling

Physical and cognitive developmental level and ability (children only)

Literacy and numeracy skills

Preferred learning style

Special needs

Emotional needs

Social needs

Describe the resources available for your program.

Program resources

Available resources

Time

Space

Equipment

General administrative support

Step 2 Worksheets Identify personal and environmental mediators of change

References

Step 3 Worksheets Selecting theory and philosophy
In Step 3, you lay out the theoretical and philosophical basis for your nutrition education program. Additionally, you identify the components that will make up your program.
At the end of the Step 3 worksheets, you should have the following products:
Step 3A: Program theoretical model
Step 3B: Statement of personal philosophy of nutrition education
Step 3C: Statement of personal perspective on nutrition content and issues
Step 3D: List of program components
Use the provided worksheets as a guide to help you select your theory model and describe your program’s philosophy. Electronic versions of these worksheets are available at http://nutrition.jbpub.com/education/2e/. If you are unable to access the worksheets electronically, you can write onto this blank worksheet or create a text document that uses the same flow of information.

Step 3A: Theoretical model for program

State the theoretical model you will be using for your program. Then draw a diagram of the model you selected, including the mediators you will address and how they relate to one another and your target behavior. Use the data you included in Steps 2C and 2D to guide your theory model selection.

Step 3B: Philosophy of nutrition education

Describe your philosophy of nutrition education.

Step 3 Worksheets Selecting theory and philosophy

Step 3C: Perspectives on nutrition content and issues

Provide your perspective on nutrition content and issues relevant to your program goals.

Step 3D: Program components

List and/or diagram the components that will make up your program.

Step 4 Worksheets Translating behavioral theory into education and support objectives
In Step 4, you translate behavioral theory into the program objectives that you need to guide the design of educational experiences and environmental-policy support activities. These objectives are directed at potential mediators of change.
At the end of the Step 4 worksheets, you will have the following product:
Step 4: Several sets of objectives for your program that cut across all components.
Use the provided worksheets as a guide to help you write educational and support objectives rooted in your theory model from Step 3. Electronic versions of these worksheets are available at http://nutrition.jbpub.com/education/2e. If you are unable to access the worksheet electronically, you can write onto this blank worksheet or create a text document that uses the same flow of information.

Step 4: Nutrition education program objectives for all components

Determine the nutrition education program objectives that will cut across all program components to achieve the program behavioral goals for each of the three categories below.

Motivational objectives

Action objectives

Environmental-policy support objectives

Step 5 Worksheets for Individual-Level Components Designing activities for mediators
In Step 5, you use your theoretical model, philosophy of nutrition education, and nutrition education program objectives to create (1) educational plans for the individual-level components and (2) environmental supports plans for environmental/ policy components.
These pages of the Step 5 worksheets are devoted to designing educational plans for activities directed at individuals, referred to here as the individual-level components. Generally, the primary individual-level component consists of one or more group sessions. (You can also use these worksheets to design other individual-level components, such as newsletters and media-related activities.)
You should have one educational plan for each group session you design (or newsletter or other component directed at individuals).
At the end of the Step 5 worksheets for the individual-level components, you will have the following products:
Step 5A: General educational objectives for each session or series of sessions directed at the same behavioral goal
Step 5B: An overall design plan for the session in the form of a matrix that links mediators, objectives, and activities
Step 5C: A narrative educational plan that translates the matrix into a form ready for teaching or presenting
Use these worksheets as an organizational guide to help you design your educational plan and translate theory mediators into educational activities. Electronic versions of these worksheets are available at http://nutrition.jbpub.com/education/2e. If you are unable to access the worksheets electronically, you can write

onto this blank worksheet or create a text document that uses the same flow of information.

Step 5A: General educational objectives

Educational plan title: ______________________________________________________________________
Program goal behaviors: ______________________________________________________________________
Write the general educational objectives.

Mediator (from Step 3)

General educational objectives

Step 5 Worksheets for Individual-Level Components Designing activities for mediators

Step 5B: Designing the educational plan: matrix format

Design your educational (or lesson) plan in matrix format. Write specific objectives for the mediators in your theory model (Step 3). Identify the learning domain and level for each objective. Then write the theory-based strategy you will employ to address the mediator and create educational activities that will be meaningful, interesting, and appropriate for your audience and will operationalize strategy.
Sequence your educational activities based on the events of instruction. After you have completed creating activities for each of the mediators in your theory model, go back through the design matrix and carefully identify each of the strategies/activities as to where it should fall in a sequence suitable for implementing with your audience. Label each activity as to whether it will be used to (A) gain attention, (S) present stimulus or new material, (G) provide guidance and practice, or (C) apply and close the session. These are referred to as the “Events of Instruction” or “EoI.”
Carefully re-order the matrix. If the mediators and the related activities you have created are not at first listed in your matrix in the properly sequenced order (i.e., gain attention to apply and close), then carefully re-order the matrix so all activities as well as mediators and objectives are in the proper sequenced order ready to use to create your educational plan or teaching plan.

Mediator

(from Step 3)

Specific educational objectives*

Learning domain/level*

Theory-based strategy** and

educational activities, experiences, and/or content

*C = cognitive domain; A = affective domain; P = psychomotor domain.

Step 5 Worksheets for Individual-Level Components Designing activities for mediators

Step 5C: Educational plan

Write a narrative educational plan, based on your design matrix, that you will actually use to deliver your session. Think of a catchy title that will be meaningful to your audience. Make sure that activities are sequenced based on order of instruction. For each educational activity create a heading with a title and the mediator(s) addressed. Then write a detailed procedure for the activity. It is customary to place an overview or outline of activities and a materials list at the beginning of the teaching plan.

Overview of Content Materials

Procedure

Step 5 Worksheets for Individual-Level Components Designing activities for mediators
In Step 5, you use your theoretical model, philosophy of nutrition education, and nutrition education program objectives to create (1) educational plans for the individual-level components and (2) environmental support plans for environmental/ policy components.
These pages of the Step 5 worksheets are devoted to designing educational plans for activities directed at individuals, referred to here as the individual-level components. Generally, the primary individual-level component consists of one or more group sessions. (You can also use these worksheets to design other individual-level components, such as newsletters and media-related activities.)
You should have one educational plan for each group session you design (or newsletter or other component directed at individuals).
At the end of the Step 5 worksheets for the individual-level components, you will have the following products:
Step 5A: General educational objectives for each session or series of sessions directed at the same behavioral goal
Step 5B: An overall design plan for the session in the form of a matrix that links mediators, objectives, and activities
Step 5C: A narrative educational plan that translates the matrix into a form ready for teaching or presenting
Use these worksheets as an organizational guide to help you design your educational plan and translate theory mediators into educational activities. Electronic versions of these worksheets are available at http://nutrition.jbpub.com/education/2e/. If you are unable to access the worksheets electronically, you can write onto this blank worksheet or create a text document that uses the same flow of information.

Step 5A: General educational objectives

Educational plan title: ______________________________________________________________________
Program goal behaviors: ______________________________________________________________________
Write the general educational objectives.

Mediator (from Step 3)

General educational objectives

Step 5 Worksheets for Individual-Level Components Designing activities for mediators

Step 5B: Designing the educational plan: matrix format

Design your educational (or lesson) plan in matrix format. Write specific objectives for the mediators in your theory model (Step 3). Identify the learning domain and level for each objective. Then, write the theory-based strategy you will employ to address the mediator and create educational activities that will be meaningful, interesting, and appropriate for your audience and will operationalize strategy.
Sequence your educational activities based on the events of instruction. After you have completed creating activities for each of the mediators in your theory model, go back through the design matrix and carefully identify each of the strategies/activities as to where it should fall in a sequence suitable for implementing with your audience. Label each activity as to whether it will be used to (A) gain attention, (S) present stimulus or new material, (G) provide guidance and practice, or (C) apply and close the session. These are referred to as the “Events of Instruction” or “EoI.”
Carefully re-order the matrix. If the mediators and the related activities you have created are not at first listed in your matrix in the properly sequenced order (i.e., gain attention to apply and close), then carefully re-order the matrix so all activities as well as mediators and objectives are in the proper sequenced order ready to use to create your educational plan or teaching plan.

Mediator

(from Step 3)

Specific educational objectives*

Learning domain/level

Theory-based strategy** and

educational activities, experiences, and/or content

*C = cognitive domain; A = affective domain; P = psychomotor domain.

Step 5 Worksheets for Individual-Level Components Designing activities for mediators

Step 5C: Educational plan

Write a narrative educational plan, based on your design matrix, that you will actually use to deliver your session. Think of a catchy title that will be meaningful to your audience. Make sure that activities are sequenced based on order of instruction. For each educational activity create a heading with a title and the mediator(s) addressed. Then write a detailed procedure for the activity. It is customary to place an overview or outline of activities and a materials list at the beginning of the teaching plan.

Overview of Content

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| August 3, 2016

In any organization, regardless of the industry, some level of conflict and/or office bickering is inevitable and may have a damaging impact on productivity and motivation or morale. However, it is the responsibility of the manager to ensure that conflict is avoided whenever possible and, when it does occur, it is handled in an appropriate and respectful manner. With this in mind, listen to the podcast, Stop the Medical Office Bickering and respond to your selected option.
Option A: Case Study: A Matter of Motivation: The Delayed Promotion
Review the details of the case above from your course text, and respond to the following questions:
Thoroughly analyze the likely state of your ability to motivate yourself in your new position. In the process, comment to whatever extent you feel necessary on your level of confidence in the relative stability of your position and how this might affect your performance.
Describe the most likely motivational state of your HIM staff at the time you assumed the director’s position, and explain in detail why this state probably exists.
Based on the podcast, what are some proactive strategies that management could have used to reduce the potential for conflict in this situation?
Background from Text.
Case A:
A Matter of Motivation: The delayed Promotion
With considerable advance notice, the director of health information management resigned to take a similar position in a hospital in another state. Within the department it was commonly assumed that you, the assistant director, would be appointed director; however, a month after the former director’s departure, the department still running without a director. Day-to-day operations had apparently been left in your hands, but the hospital’s chief operating officer had begun to make some of the administrative decisions affecting the department.
After another month had passed, you learned “through the grapevine” that the hospital had interviewed several candidates for the position of director of health information management. Nobody had been hired.
During the next few weeks you tried several times to discuss your uncertain status with the COO. Each time you tried, you were told simply to “keep doing what you are now doing.”

Four months after the previous director’s departure, you were promoted to director of HIM. The first instruction you received from the COO was to abolish the position of assistant director.
Answer

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Discussion: Please respond to one of the following questions considering different cultures and multiple intelligences when designing health promotion programs.
What three specific actions can you take to ensure your program is culturally appropriate?
Why it is important to consider multiple intelligences when designing health promotion programs?

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Review the details of the case Authority and Leadership: Rising From the Ranks from your course text, and respond to the following questions:
Identify the potential advantages Julie might enjoy in becoming manager of a group of which she has long been a member, and contrast these with the possible disadvantages that might present themselves because she has long been a member of this group.

Describe how Julie will have to proceed in establishing herself as the legitimate possessor or supervisory authority on the unit, and describe the sources and forms of Julie’s authority.

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Visit the Healthy People 2010 website and review the 28 focus areas. Select one focus area and summarize how the materials for a health education or health promotion would have to be adjusted to meet unique program needs or the needs of a specific target population. The link to the website is located below in the Web Resources section.

Requirements:
APA Formatting
The paper should be approximately two pages in length, double-spaced using 12-point Times New Roman font, using references to support your response.

Web Resources
Healthy People 2010 Focus Areas at a Glance at:http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/healthy_people/hp2010/hp2010_focus_areas.htm
Health Promotion and Health Education athttp://phpartners.org/hpro.html
World Health Organization Programs and Projects athttp://www.who.int/entity/en/
ID: HW425-05-05-R

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Research the effects of lighting in a manufacturing facility. Write a minimum of three pages describing your findings in great detail. One of the pages may be your references. Use Times New Roman font with 12 size. Double Spaced.

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A group working at the University of California, Berkeley has developed “nanothermometers,” little nanoparticles that can be injected into cells to measure the temperature in various places in the cell. So far, they have been used in cells growing in a culture dish. Indicate what you think the group will discover about the temperature in different parts of the cell. Discuss whether you believe it will be the same or different, and explain why.

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. What is a planetary nebula?

2. What would the major impact be on Earth be if the Earth remained in its present orbit and our Sun was 50% more massive than it is now?

3. Under certain circumstances a white dwarf will go nova becoming much brighter for a short period of time. What special circumstance is required for this event to occur?.

4. Why is a large mass required to have a supernova event?

5. How are neutron stars created?

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Please choose ONE of the following questions to respond to. Be sure to indicate in your response which question you chose.

Question 1 (Chapter 13)

The larger the mass of a star, the higher the internal pressures. Higher internal pressures causes higher temperatures and it is temperature that determines the types of fusion that can occur deep in a stars interior. Discuss the types of fusion that can occur in a star, the temperatures at which they occur, and the mass required to produce them.

Question 2 (Chapter 14)

Discuss the causes, characteristics, and major features of black holes. Explain why the concept of a black hole does or doesn’t seem reasonable to you and provide some rationale for your views?

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| August 3, 2016

We will have a research proposal on one of the following two topics:

1. The topic of your final presentation. For this you will need to consider the author’s work in the context of the greater societal or human problem. Did their methodology lead to a new treatment of disease, new health policy, etc? If not, what are the limiting factors that remain and how can you contribute to this area of research? Formulate a problem based on your knowledge of the topic and prepare a research proposal using the guidelines below.

2. Bacteria form infections in part by the colonization of tissues, organs, etc., as a result of normal every day activity. They also arise within hospital settings, where they come in contact with patients through catheters, implanted devices or transplants after surgery, etc. Select a mode of infection and a pathogen or pathogens of interest. Develop an understanding for how these bacteria mediate virulence and identify holes in the current state of the art for treating infections. The area might focus on (i) understanding mechanisms for resistance, (ii) new modes of antibiotic/antimicrobial drug discovery, (iii) new modes of antibiotic or antimicrobial delivery, (iv) new device materials, or (v) new sensing modalities for identifying infectious agents. Select one of these areas and prepare a proposal.

General Guidelines:

The objective of the written proposal is to communicate how a specific research problem may be investigated. The proposal format will be similar to an NIH R21 proposal (http://grants.nih.gov/grants/funding/r21.htm). The proposal is not to exceed 6 pages using an 11-point Arial font, 1-inch margins, and 1.0 line spacing. The 6-page limitation covers the proposal body text, as well as any figures, tables, and schemes. The title page, abstract, specific aims, and cited references are the only sections that do not count toward the 6-page limitation. The specific aims, however, are limited to 1 page. The following details delineate the section requirements within the written proposal as well as the purpose of each section.

Title Page: The first page should include your name, title of your proposal, and signed honor pledge (this is not part of the 6 pages).

Abstract: A brief description of the problem of interest, its significance, and the proposed investigation.

Specific Aims: State concisely the goals of the proposed research and summarize the expected outcome(s), including the impact that the results of the proposed research may have on the research field(s) involved. List succinctly the specific objectives of the research proposed, e.g., to test a stated hypothesis, create a novel design, solve a specific problem, challenge an existing paradigm or clinical practice, address a critical barrier to progress in the field, or develop new technology. The topics should follow those stated above. The specific aims section is limited to 1 page.

Research Strategy: Organize the research strategy in the specified order and using the instructions provided below. Start each section with the appropriate section heading—Significance, Innovation, Approach.

Significance

· Explain the importance of the problem or critical barrier to progress in the field that the proposed project addresses.

· Explain how the proposed project improves scientific knowledge, technical capability, and/or clinical practice in one or more broad fields.

· Describe how the concepts, methods, technologies, treatments, services, or preventative interventions that drive this field may change if the proposed aims are achieved.

Innovation

· Explain how the application challenges and seeks to shift current research or clinical practice paradigms.

· Describe any novel theoretical concepts, approaches or methodologies, instrumentation or intervention(s) to be developed or used, and any advantage over existing methodologies, instrumentation or intervention(s).

· Explain any refinements, improvements, or new applications of theoretical concepts, approaches or methodologies, instrumentation or interventions.

Approach

· This is the core of the proposal. This section should occupy at least 70% of the allotted page limit.

· Describe the overall strategy, methodology, and analyses to be used to accomplish the specific aims of the project. Include how the data will be collected, analyzed, and interpreted.

· Discuss potential problems, alternative strategies, and benchmarks for success anticipated to achieve the aims.

· Describe strategies to establish feasibility, and address the management of any high-risk aspects of the proposed work.

· Point out any procedures, situations, or materials that may be hazardous to personnel and precautions to be exercised.

Cited References: Cite sources for background information and experimental plan.